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New Underwater Museum in Cannes

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A new underwater museum has opened in Cannes, France this month. Funded by the Mairie de Cannes and commissioned by its mayor, David Lisnard, the project took over 4 years to develop and is the work of British sculptor Jason de Caires Taylor.

The Museum is Jason de Caires Taylor’s first installation in the Mediterranean Sea. It follows on from his previous work, the most famous of which is the world’s first underwater sculpture park – the Molinere Underwater Sculpture Park in Grenada in the Caribbean.

The Museum in Cannes features a series of six monumental three-dimensional portraits, each over two metres in height and ten tons in weight. They are sited near the island of Sainte-Marguerite, one of the Lérins Islands, just off the coast of Cannes. Placed at a depth of between two and three metres, these artworks rest on areas of white sand, in-between oscillating posidonia sea grass meadows in the protected southern part of the island. The shallow depth and close proximity to shore make the site easily accessible, and the crystal-clear waters provide ideal conditions for snorkelling. This is the one museum you can access in a socially-distant way, wearing a scuba mask over your eyes rather than a mask over your mouth.

The six works are based on portraits of local members of the community, covering a range of ages and professions, for example, Maurice – an 80 year old local fisherman –  and Anouk – a 9- year old primary school pupil. Each face is significantly upscaled and sectioned into two parts, the outer part resembling a mask. The theme of masks connects to the history of Île Sainte-Marguerite, well known as the location where the Man with the Iron Mask was imprisoned. Cannes, through its famous annual film festival, is well known for its relationship with the performing arts.

The location of the sculptures was previously an area of disused marine infrastructure. Part of the project was a significant clearing of the site, removing marine debris such as old engines and pipelines to create a space for the installation of artworks which have been specifically designed, using Ph neutral materials, to attract marine fauna and flora. The site has now been cordoned off from boats, making it safe for snorkellers and divers, and preventing damage by anchors to the seagrass meadows. Posidonia grass is a vital habitat area and is sometimes referred to as the lungs of the ocean for the vast amount of oxygen it creates. With all his projects, Jason aims to draw attention to the sea as a fragile biosphere in urgent need of protection.

The split mask is a metaphor for the ocean. One side of the mask depicts strength and resilience, the other fragility and decay. From land, we see the surface, calm and serene, or powerful and majestic. This is the view of the mask of the sea. However below the surface is a fragile, finely-balanced ecosystem – one which has been continuously degraded and polluted over the years by human activity.

You can find out more about The Museum and Jason de Caires Taylor at www.underwatersculpture.comor on Instagram – #jasondecairestaylor.


Images: @jasondecairestaylor – www.underwatersculpture.com

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The Suit Ocean Team leads the Ultimate Curacao Snorkeling Adventure

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By Bryan Horne
Snorkeling and scuba diving in Curacao is a dream for anyone who loves the combination of amazing beaches and the mind blowing biodiversity that exists along 104 square kilometers of its fringing coral reefs. So if you are interested in the ultimate Caribbean snorkeling adventure then keep reading as The Suit Ocean Team takes you on a one hundred kilometer snorkeling tour of Curacao’s southern shoreline.

As passionate residents of our Dutch Caribbean Island, we must congratulate The Suit Ocean Team for creating more awareness about the importance of protecting our beautiful fringing reef systems in Curacao.

The film, Curacao Underwater Kunuku (Kunuku is Papiamento for Garden), not only documents this ultimate snorkeling adventure showing you how easy it is for everyone to access and enjoy a snorkel or diving experience, but it also showcases the interaction between man and nature, highlighting the beauty of underwater life while promoting conservation, preservation and the need to protect these vital habitats.

These are the key ingredients to this beautiful short film documentary. Watch NOW and please enjoy our “CURACAO UNDERWATER KUNUKU”.

This film, produced by the Lawrence Mensa Foundation (LMF), is also available in multiple languages including: Spanish, Papiamentu, Dutch, Portuguese and German.

Images courtesy of The Suit Ocean Team
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7 best places to go snorkeling in Brazil

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With more than 7,000 km of coastline dotted with bustling cities, white-sand beaches and coral reefs, Brazil offers a unique mix of culture, history and world-class snorkeling. This fascinating country is home to the largest coral reef system in the South Atlantic Ocean and has numerous snorkeling destinations. Between them, they include wreck diving meccas, vibrant coral reefs, marine parks, and a UNESCO World Heritage Center. But where are the best places to go snorkeling in this vast country? Let’s find out in our round-up of the best snorkeling in Brazil.

1) Recife

Recife is the main city in the state of Pernambuco and takes its name from the many reefs, or ‘recifes’, that surround its shoreline. It is known as the shipwreck capital of Brazil and boasts dozens of shipwrecks, from historic 19th Century ships through to modern vessels. All of which are thriving artificial reefs surrounded by huge schools of fish.

Whilst you won’t be able to access many of the wrecks as a snorkeler, Recife’s numerous reefs offer easy snorkeling in warm, clear waters all year. There are numerous reef fish to observe among the patch reefs, plus sharks, sea turtles and rays.

 2) Fernando de Noronha

Take a trip 400 km offshore from Recife and explore a UNESCO World Heritage Centre, the Fernando de Noronha archipelago. This volcanic archipelago offers the best snorkeling in Brazil and has countless undisturbed snorkeling spots.

Famed for its clear waters and spectacular topography, Fernando de Noronha is made up of 21 islands that are home to seabirds, reptiles and abundant marine life – including spinner dolphins. It is a sanctuary for wildlife and a National Marine Park that offers exceptional scuba diving, surfing and snorkeling.

Fernando’s waters are extremely important as a breeding and feeding ground for tuna, sharks, sea turtles and marine mammals. Go snorkeling there and you have a good chance of encountering the resident dolphins and schools of pelagic fish.

There are caves, swim-throughs, tunnels and caverns dotted around the islands, with beautiful rock formations that host an array of reef fish. With lagoons and tidal pools as well, Fernando de Noronha is a must for any ocean fan.

3) Porto de Galinhas

Porto de Galinhas is a small coastal city an hour’s drive down the coast from Recife and has a long golden beach with reefs sitting just offshore. Simply step off the beach into the warm, azure waters and you’ll find lots of colorful fish and reef life.

The waters are shallow, clear and calm, making it perfect for snorkelers. There are also rock formations that have created snorkeling pools, with hot water around 28°C. This is a great place for novices to learn how to snorkel or try scuba diving for the first time.

4) Ilha Grande

The oceanic islands near Rio de Janeiro are a must for snorkelers. These islands attract diverse marine life and are the perfect place to spot and photograph numerous fish species, plus moray eels, rays, sea turtles, octopi, and visiting dolphins.

Ilha Grande is one of the most famous islands and has clear waters, forest trails, and excellent snorkeling. You can cruise around the island, dipping in and out of the water and exploring the soft, white-sand beaches all day long.

5) Regiao dos Lagos

Regiao dos Lagos in the state of Rio de Janeiro is a popular region that has some of the most famous beaches in Brazil. This area receives nutrient-rich, cold waters from the South Atlantic Ocean, attracting an array of different marine species. There are lobsters, sea turtles, friendly dolphins, pelagic fish, and rays in these rich waters.

Costa Azul is one of the most famous places there and is thought to have some of the best diving in Brazil, thanks to its many dive sites, plus dive centers that offer kit hire for all your snorkeling needs. There are numerous snorkeling spots and softy, sandy beaches with clear, shallow waters.

6) Abrolhos Archipelago

The Abrolhos archipelago is a group of five uninhabited islands off Brazil’s southern Bahia coast and is home to the Abrolhos Marine National Park. This unique park offers some of the best diving and snorkeling in the world and is famous for its rare coral formations.

The crystal-clear waters of the Abrolhos archipelago are home to the most extensive coral reefs in all of the South Atlantic Ocean and host around 19 coral species, including brain coral. These are some of the most interesting reefs in South America.

Many of these reefs are called ‘chapeiroes’ because they grow upwards in columns that resemble huge mushrooms. These unusual reefs host around 160 fish species and numerous sea turtles. The marine park is also known for its visiting humpback whales. Visit from July to November for the best chance of spotting these ocean giants.

7) Sao Paolo

Sao Paolo is Brazil’s largest city and is a dazzling cultural, architectural, and fashion center with iconic buildings and a great selection of museums. It is also home to the Laje de Santos Marine Park, a famous migratory route for manta rays.

Sao Paolo’s coast is dotted with multiple dive and snorkeling sites in the north and south, which can be reached with a short boat ride. The Laje de Santos Marine Park is the most popular place for divers and snorkelers in the area. As well as numerous visiting mantas and sea turtles, this marine park hosts pelagic fish, rocky-bottom fish, crustaceans and South Atlantic species.

For the best chance of encountering manta rays at Sao Paola, visit from March to September.


Kathryn Curzon, a shark conservationist and dive travel writer for SSI (Scuba Schools International), wrote this article.

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